A biography of sir christopher wren born under the rule of charles i

The list of his works in and around London amounts to seventy buildings designed by him, while about another ten have been attributed to him without documentary proof. Nearly fifty of these buildings still exist- including a cathedral, palatial works for the king, houses, an observatory, monuments and numerous churches.

A biography of sir christopher wren born under the rule of charles i

East Knoyle, Wiltshire, England, 20 October ; d. London, England, 25 February mathematics, architecture. Wren came from a family with strong ecclesiastical traditions. His father, for whom he was named, was rector of East Knoyle, chaplain to Charles I, and later dean of Windsor.

There he became closely associated with John Wilkinswho was later bishop of Chester and a member of that distinguished group whose activities led to the formation of the Royal Society. He was elected a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, in and remained in residence there until In his inaugural lecture, after mentioning the relation of astronomy to mathematics,to theology in the interpretation of the Scrip—tures, to medicine, and above all tonavigation, he praised the new liberty in the study and observation of nature, and the rejection of the tyranny of ancient opinions.

He retained this professorship untilwhen he was appointed Savilian profesor of astronomy at Oxford, a post he occupied until Wren is best remembered as an architect.

A biography of sir christopher wren born under the rule of charles i

His fame as the most distinguished architect England has produced probably has obscured his accomplishments in other branches of science. He was perhaps the most accomplished man of his day.

While at Oxford he ranked high in his knowledge of anatomy; and his abilities as a demonstrator in that subject were acknowledged with praise by Thomas Willis in his Cerebri anatome, for which Wren made all the drawings. Wren also is said to have been the pioneer in the physiological experiments of injecting various liquids into the veins of living animals Wels, History, I, Chief among his contributions was his rectification of the cycloid.

This curve, because of its singularly beautiful properties, had long been a favorite of geometers since its discovery early in the sixteenth century.

Many of its properties had been discovered by Pascal; its rectification, the finding of a straight line equal to an arc of the curve, was effected by Wren in and also by Fermat.

In Oldenburg asked Wren, along with Wallis and Huygens, to inform the Royal Society of his research into the laws of impact. In a terse paper read on 17 December and published on 11 January in the Philosophical Transactions, Wren offered a theoretical solution based on the model of a balance beam on which the impacting bodies are suspended at distances from the point of impact proportional to their initial speeds.

Employing the further postulate that the speed of approach equals the speed of separation, Wren set forth rules of calculation that yield the center of gravity from the known sizes and initial speeds of the bodies, and then use the speeds and the center of gravity to compute the final speeds.

Even as a boy Wren had shown that he had the capacity to become a draftsman of exceptional ability. He probably applied himself to the serious study of the subject when he was commissioned to submit plans for the building of the chapel of Pembroke College, Cambridge, which was completed in His next major achievement was the building of the Sheldonian Theatre.

Christopher Wren worked with the finest building materials and craftsmen on all of his projects. Christopher Wren was knighted ca , was President of the Royal Society from to , and entered Parliament in , serving in the House of Common intermittently for a total of about three years (through 17O2) from several residence district. The erection of the present Windsor Guildhall was begun in , under the direction of Sir Thomas Fitz (or Fiddes) but, on his death in , the task was taken over by Sir Christopher Wren, whose childhood home had been Windsor, and was completed at a cost of £ - 1s - 6d. The English architect Sir Christopher Wren () interpreted the baroque style in England and dominated English architecture for 50 years. His most important work is St. Paul 's Cathedral, London.

Oxford, a model of which was exhibited before the newly formed Royal Society in April It was completed inand in that year Charles II appointed Wren surveyor of the royal works, a post he retained for half a century. Meanwhile, the Great Fire had given Wren a unique opportunity to display his skill as an architect.

Much of the City of London had been destroyed in the conflagration, including the old St. This building, ancient and ruinous, had long been in urgent need of repairs; and just before the fire Wren had been invited by the dean to prepare plans for the building of a new cathedral.

This second scheme was accepted, and a warrant for the building of the cathedral was issued in The first stone was laid on 21 Juneand after many delays the cathedral was finished in Much of the City having been destroyed, Wren was invited to submit plans for the rebuilding of some fifty churches consumed in the flames.

These are described in plarentalia, — Wren received many honors. In he was knighted. Wren also represented many constituencies in Parliament at different periods. In he married Faith Coghill, of Blechingdon, Oxford, by whom he had two sons, oneof whom survived him.

On the death of Lady wren he married Jane Fitzwilliam, by whom he had a son had a daughter. Wren played a prominent part in the formation of the Royal Society of London, which arose out of the informal gatherings of the votaries of experimental science that took place about the middle of the seventeenth century.Sir Christopher Wren, (born October 20, , East Knoyle, Wiltshire, England—died February 25, , London), designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time.

Turn to architecture Wren designed 53 London churches, including St.
Wren, Christopher Version for printing Christopher Wren's father was also called Christopher Wren. Christopher Wren senior was a well educated man, having graduated from St John's College Oxford before entering the Church.
BIBLIOGRAPHY Asanterabi Laizer Contents 1:

Wren designed 53 London churches, including St. Paul’s Cathedral, as well as many secular buildings of note. As Summerson observed, Sir Christopher Wren had died at the age of thirty he would still have been remembered but his entry in the Dictionary of National Biography would have not only listed his works as a scientist or a mathematician but also as an architect.

Sir Christopher Wren was an English scientist and architect, important for confirming, in what later was jokingly referred to as the "Wrenaissance," a tradition of classical architecture in England in the seventeenth century that lasted for two centuries.

Christopher Wren's father was also called Christopher Wren. Christopher Wren senior was a well educated man, having graduated from St John's College Oxford before entering the Church. Christopher Wren senior was a well educated man, having graduated from St John's College Oxford before entering the Church.

Christopher Wren worked with the finest building materials and craftsmen on all of his projects.

Early academic career and scientific pursuits

Christopher Wren was knighted ca , was President of the Royal Society from to , and entered Parliament in , serving in the House of Common intermittently for a total of about three years (through 17O2) from several residence district.

Christopher Wren was born on October 20, , in East Knoyle, Wiltshire, to Christopher Wren Sr., the rector of East Knoyle, and his wife, Mary Cox. He had several sisters including Catherine, Susan and grupobittia.com Of Birth: East Knoyle.

Christopher Wren - Wikipedia