Argument against human cloning essay

After meeting the Count on Rattatak, [2] Ventress pledged herself to Dooku at his palace on Serenno, agreeing to serve at his side in exchange for teachings in the ways of the dark side of the Force. She adopted the use of twin red-bladed lightsabersfor which she became renowned.

Argument against human cloning essay

Cloning We live in a brave new world in which reproductive technologies are ravaging as well as replenishing families. Increasingly common are variations of the situation in which "baby's mother is also grandma-and sister.

This new eugenics is simply the latest version of the age-old quest to make human beings--in fact, humanity as a whole--the way we want them to be: It includes our efforts to be rid of unwanted human beings through abortion and euthanasia. It more recently is focusing on our growing ability to understand and manipulate our genetic code, which directs the formation of many aspects of who we are, for better and for worse.

We aspire to complete control over the code, though at this point relatively little is possible. This backdrop can help us understand the great fascination with human Argument against human cloning essay today.

It promises to give us a substantial measure of power over the genetic makeup of our offspring. We cannot control their code exactly, but the first major step in that direction is hugely appealing: You can have a child whose genetic code is exactly like your own. And you didn't turn out so badly, did you?

Top Recommended Argumentative Essay Topics

Admittedly, in our most honest moments we would improve a few things about ourselves. So the larger agenda here remains complete genetic control. But human cloning represents one concrete step in that direction, and the forces pushing us from behind to take that step are tremendous.

These forces are energized, as we will see, by the very ways we look at life and justify our actions. But before examining such forces, we need a clearer view of human cloning itself. The Rising Prospect of Human Cloning It was no longer ago than when the president of the United States first challenged the nation and charged his National Bioethics Advisory Commission 2 to give careful thought to how the United States should proceed regarding human cloning.

Attention to this issue was spurred by the reported cloning of a large mammal--a sheep--in a new way.

The method involved not merely splitting an early-stage embryo to produce identical twins. Rather, it entailed producing a nearly exact genetic replica of an already existing adult. The technique is called nuclear transfer or nuclear transplantation because it involves transferring the nucleus and thus most of the genetic material from a cell of an existing being to an egg cell in order to replace the egg cell's nucleus.

Stimulated to divide by the application of electrical energy, this egg--now embryo--is guided by its new genetic material to develop as a being who is genetically almost identical to the being from which the nucleus was taken.

This process was reportedly carried out in a sheep to produce the sheep clone named Dolly 3 but attention quickly shifted to the prospects for cloning human beings by which I will mean here and throughout, cloning by nuclear transfer.

Quickly people began to see opportunities for profit and notoriety. Byfor example, scientist Richard Seed had announced intentions to set up a Human Clone Clinic--first in Chicago, then in ten to twenty locations nationally, then in five to six locations internationally.

Such research has been slowed in the United States since the president and then Congress withheld federal government funds from research that subjects embryos to risk for non-therapeutic purposes. Stem cells can treat many illnesses and can have the capacity to develop into badly needed body parts such as tissues and organs.

One way to obtain stem cells is to divide an early stage embryo into its component cells--thereby destroying the embryonic human being. Inhis newly-formed Council on Bioethics raised serious questions about even this form of embryonic stem cell research, through the Council was divided on this matter.

While embryo and stem cell research are very important issues, they are distinct ethically from the question of reproducing human beings through cloning. Reproduction by cloning is the specific focus of this essay.

While no scientifically verifiable birth of a human clone has yet been reported, the technology and scientific understanding are already in place to make such an event plausible at any time now.

There is an urgent need to think through the relevant ethical issues. To begin with, is it acceptable to refer to human beings produced by cloning technology as "clones"?

It would seem so, as long as there does not become a stigma attached to that term that is not attached to more cumbersome expressions like "a person who is the result of cloning" or "someone created through the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer.

So it can be that a person "from cloning" is a clone. We must be ready to abandon this term, however, if it becomes a label that no longer meets certain ethical criteria.

In order to address the ethics of human cloning itself, we need to understand why people would want to do it in the first place.

People often respond to the prospect of human cloning in two ways. They are squeamish about the idea--a squeamishness Leon Kass has argued we should take very seriously. Such fascination is captured in a variety of films, including "The Boys from Brazil" portraying the attempt to clone Adolf Hitler"Bladerunner" questioning whether a clone would be more like a person or a machineand "Multiplicity" presenting a man's attempt to have enough time for his family, job, and other pursuits by producing several live adult replicas of himself.

Popular discussions center on the wonderful prospects of creating multiple Mother Teresas, Michael Jordans, or other notable figures. The greatest problem with creative media-driven discussions like this is that they often reflect a misunderstanding of the science and people involved.An essay in four parts donated by Anthony Ashford Part 1 of 4: Why Christians should embrace same-sex relationships.

Reason 6. Reason six: The biblical passages typically used to "condemn" LGB relationships are NOT talking about LGB relationships. Eugenics (/ j uː ˈ dʒ ɛ n ɪ k s /; from Greek εὐγενής eugenes 'well-born' from εὖ eu, 'good, well' and γένος genos, 'race, stock, kin') is a set of beliefs and practices that aims at improving the genetic quality of a human population.

The exact definition of eugenics has been a matter of debate since the term was coined by Francis Galton in Fideisms Judaism is the Semitic monotheistic fideist religion based on the Old Testament's ( BCE) rules for the worship of Yahweh by his chosen people, the children of Abraham's son Isaac (c BCE)..

Zoroastrianism is the Persian monotheistic fideist religion founded by Zarathustra (cc BCE) and which teaches that good must be chosen over evil in order to achieve salvation.

An essay in four parts donated by Anthony Ashford

2. Your thesis statement should present the argument to be discussed. It should be specific and doesn’t necessarily need to be concise. Examples of thesis statements are below. Two-factor authentication isn't our savior.

It won't defend against phishing. It's not going to prevent identity theft. It's not going to secure online accounts from fraudulent transactions. It solves the security problems we had ten years ago, not the security problems we have today. The problem.

Argument against human cloning essay

Transhumanism (abbreviated as H+ or h+) is an international philosophical movement that advocates for the transformation of the human condition by developing and making widely available sophisticated technologies to greatly enhance human intellect and physiology..

Transhumanist thinkers study the potential benefits and dangers of emerging technologies that could overcome fundamental human.

Argument against human cloning essay
Transhumanism - Wikipedia